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Friday, May 15, 2020 | History

2 edition of Susceptibility of woody plants to sulphur dioxide and photochemical oxidants found in the catalog.

Susceptibility of woody plants to sulphur dioxide and photochemical oxidants

Donald D. Davis

Susceptibility of woody plants to sulphur dioxide and photochemical oxidants

a literature review

by Donald D. Davis

  • 199 Want to read
  • 14 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Corvallis Environmental Research Laboratory, for sale by the National Technical Information Service in Corvallis, Or, Springfield, Va .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Woody plants,
  • Sulfur dioxide,
  • Photochemistry -- Research,
  • Plants -- Effect of ozone on,
  • Ozone

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Donald D. Davis and Raymond G. Wilhour
    SeriesEnvironmental research series ; EPA-600/3-76-102
    ContributionsWilhour, R. G., United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Research and Development, Pennsylvania State University. Dept. of Plant Pathology
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 72 p. :
    Number of Pages72
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13564262M

    PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDANTS AND AIR POLLUTION: AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY PART II. Office of Technical Information and Publications Air Pollution Technical Information Center U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Air Pollution Control Office Research Triangle Park, North Carolina March For mle by tbe Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office . @article{osti_, title = {Effects of growth retardants and fumigations with ozone and sulfur dioxide on growth and flowering of Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd}, author = {Cathey, H.M. and Heggestad, H.E.}, abstractNote = {Eight cultivars of poinsettia, Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd., were evaluated for sensitivity alphacyclopropylcap alpha.

    Six plant species were exposed for 4 hr to nitrogen dioxide and/or sulfur dioxide in greenhouse exposure chambers. Although concentrations of nitrogen dioxide below ppHM and concentrations of sulfur dioxide below 50 ppHM caused no leaf injury, injury did develop when plants were exposed to mixtures of 5 to 15 ppHM of each of the two gases. matter, sulfur dioxide, photochemical oxidants, hydro-carbons, and nitrogen oxides. Lead was added to the list in , ozone replaced photochemical oxidants in , and hydrocarbons were dropped in Total suspended particulate matter was revised in .

    How should sulphur dioxide and sulphites be labelled on a product? Sulphur dioxide and sulphites are considered allergens (under Regulation (EU) No. / on the provision of food information to consumers) and can cause reactions in certain people, especially those sensitive to asthma. FINAL REPORT ON AIR POLLUTION EFFECTS ON WOODY PLANTS Project Period: May 1, - Ma Environmental Protection Agency Grant No. R by Donald D. Davis Principal Investigator Centre for Air Environment Studies The Pennsylvania State University Fenske Laboratory University Park, Pennsylvania


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Susceptibility of woody plants to sulphur dioxide and photochemical oxidants by Donald D. Davis Download PDF EPUB FB2

EPA/ September SUSCEPTIBILITY OF WOODY PLANTS TO SULFUR DIOXIDE AND PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDANTS A Literature Review by Donald D. Davis Department of Plant Pathology Center for Air Environment Studies The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania and Raymond 6.

Get this from a library. Susceptibility of woody plants to sulphur dioxide and photochemical oxidants: a literature review.

[Donald D Davis; R G Wilhour; United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Research and Development.; Pennsylvania State University. Department of Plant. Get this from a library. Susceptibility of woody plants to sulphur dioxide and photochemical oxidants: a literature review.

[Donald D Davis; R G Wilhour; Corvallis Environmental Research Laboratory,; Pennsylvania State University. Department of Plant Pathology.]. Susceptibility of woody plants to sulphur dioxide and photochemical oxidants: a literature review / By Donald D. Davis and R. Wilhour.

Abstract. PB Prepared by Department of Plant Pathology, Center for Air Environmental Studies, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pa., and Terrestrial Ecology Branch, Ecological Effects Author: Donald D.

Davis and R. Wilhour. Abstract: Shrubs and trees are assumed less likely to lose genetic variation in response to habitat fragmentation because they have certain life‐history characteristics such as long lifespans and extensive pollen flow. To test this assumption, we conducted a meta‐analysis with data on 97 woody plant species derived from 98 studies of habitat by: In order to evaluate the susceptibility level of plants to air pollutants, four parameters, namely ascorbic acid, chlorophyll, relative water content, and leaf-extract pH, were determined and computed together in a formulation signifying the air pollution tolerance index (APTI) of by: 6.

DAVIS D. and WILHOUR R. () Sus- ceptibility of woody plants to sulfur dioxide and photochemical oxidants. EPA/ 7. DEAN C. () Stomate density and size as related to ozone-induced weather fleck in tobacco. Crop Sci. 12, 8. DUGOER W. and "I'ING I. () Air pollution by: The effect of photochemical oxidants, mainly O 3 and PAN, on the forests located in the San Bernardino Mountains northeast of Los Angeles, California, has been to change the forest composition and to alter the susceptibility of forest species to pests.

A primary mechanism by which photosynthesis is reduced is through impact on carbon dioxide fixation.

Ozone induces loss in Rubisco activity associated with loss in concentration of the protein. Evidence is presented that ozone may induce oxidative modification of Rubisco leading to subsequent by: WHO Regional Office for Europe, Copenhagen, Denmark, 1 Chapter 10 Effects of sulfur dioxide on vegetation: critical levels Sulfur dioxide (SO2) was formerly viewed as the most important phytotoxic pollutant in Europe, and until the early s was the subject of the greatest research in this field.

D.D. Davis, R.G. WilhourSusceptibility of woody plants to sulfur dioxide and photochemical oxidants US Environmental Protection Agency EPA/ () Google ScholarCited by: Absorption of sulfur dioxide in the mucous membranes of the nose and upper respiratory tract occurs as a result of its solubility in aqueous media: 1 volume of water dissolves 45 volumes of sulfur dioxide at 15 oC.

Absorption is concentration-dependent, with 85% absorption in the nose at 4–6 µg/m3 and about 99% at 46 µg/ Size: KB. Mineral content and the sen- sitivity of black pine (Pinus nigra) of various provenances to industrial air pollution.

For. Ecol. Manage., Results are presented of the exposure of Pinus nigra from 10 provenances to the action of three concentrations of sulphur dioxide under Cited by: 5.

Responses of Plants to Air Pollution examines the effects of air pollutants, individually and synergistically, on both higher and lower plants. and mechanisms of pollution injury to plants. Separate chapters on sulfur dioxide, ozone, fluorides, peroxyacyl nitrates, oxides of nitrogen, and particulates follow.

Photochemical Oxidants from Book Edition: 1. A field study designed to determine the nature and extent of environmental impact by an industrial complex was carried out during the period – The industrial complex consists of two oil refineries, Mobil and Atlantic Richfield (ARCO), and an aluminium reduction plant, Intalco.

The location is northwestern Whatcom County, Washington, by: 2. Sulfur Dioxide () We've made some changes to the information you are looking for is not here, you may be able to find it on the EPA Web Archive or the Janu Web Snapshot.

TOXICOLOGICAL PROFILE FOR SULFUR DIOXIDE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Section Children’s Susceptibility Section Exposures of Children The people most often exposed to sulfur dioxide are workers in plants where sulfur dioxide.

The mutant plants show enhanced sensitivity to ozone, desiccation and sulfur dioxide, but have normal sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide, low temperature and high light levels. Sulfur dioxide inhibits photosynthesis by disrupting the photosynthetic mechanism.

The opening of the stomata is promoted by sulfur dioxide, resulting in an excessive loss of water. The cumulative effect of sulferous pollution is to reduce the quantity and quality of plant by: The work has been designed with emphasis on using the plants directly in monitoring the contamination of the atmospheric air by SO2.

An assessment was made of the impacts of long-term SO2 emissions from an oil refinery on plants located in nearby areas that are likely to be exposed to emission by: 3. Air pollutants are emitted from various sources into the atmosphere.

During winter, greenhouses are heated by the burning of fuel in heating systems, which creates sulfur dioxide (SO2) that can be detrimental to plant growth and human health. However, there is a poor understanding of the comprehensive effects of SO2 on crops in a greenhouse environment.

Therefore, this review aimed to Author: Hyun Kyung Lee, Inkyin Khaine, Myeong Ja Kwak, Ji Hwi Jang, Tae Yoon Lee, Jong Kyu Lee, Ie Reh Kim.Agricultural crops can be injured when exposed to high concentrations of various air pollutants.

Injury ranges from visible markings on the foliage, to reduced growth and yield, to premature death of the plant. The development and severity of the injury depends not only on the concentration of the particular pollutant, but also on a number of other #: ozone (O3) frequently focused on tropospheric ozone harmful to both plants and animals and causes respiratory inflammations (asthma, emphysema).

in presence of nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds, ozone reacts to form even more harmful oxidants. in presence of sulfur and nitrogen oxides, ozone and other photochemical oxidants can.